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weekly art forecasts from Central Iowa

Who’s exhibiting and opportunities for artists

Posts tagged Des Moines Arts Festival
art week for introverts
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Until the Woods Began to Move by Anna Gaskell, via Des Moines Public Art Foundation.

If getting out of your comfort zone sounds too intimidating, Des Moines Art Week also hosts a variety of smaller, more intimate events aimed at those who prefer to consume art in a quiet environment on their own. So if crowds make you nervous, be sure to check out some of these great options that will let you relax while taking in some local creative art.

Visit one of the gallery exhibits.
Many galleries are hosting special receptions with artists this Art Week, so it’s easy to forget that they’re also open during their regular hours. Stop by these places to see some great exhibitions at less busy times.

MON 4 PM Rob Stephen’s Art show at Mars Cafe
MON-THURS 11-5 Annual Landscape Show at Olsen Larson Galleries
MON-FRI 11-4:30 IOWA EXHIBITEDXXXIII at Polk County Heritage Gallery
TUES-SAT 10-6 Iowa Artists Exhibited at Moxie Gallery
FRI-SAT 7-10 Urban Visionaries Show at the Des Moines Social Club
EVERYDAY 5-2 Betsy Hart’s Cerebral Terrain at The Lift

Attend the Interrobang Film Festival

The Interrobang Film Festival presented by AARP Movies for Grownups, is three days filled with films and communication between filmmakers and audience members. The audience, whether cinema enthusiasts or curious newcomers, can experience curated screenings of 55 films form 30 different countries. Part juried competition, part public screening and part workshop, the unique film festival event allows people to experience films from artists around the globe.  Films are screened Friday, June 22nd - Sunday, June 24th in the South wing of the Des Moines Public Library located on the Des Moines Arts Festival site.

Organ Concert & Art Show at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral
6 PM, Friday. Feel free to sit in the back and enjoy the music as Central College professor and organist Mark A. Babcock plays selections on the renowned Casavant organ, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year.

Walk Through Public Art in Des Moines
Take your own, self-guided tour of the Pappajohn Sculpture Park. Look over Anna Gaskell’s pines in her piece Until the Woods Began to Move. Walk through St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral’s Rain Garden and Labyrinth. Use Art Week as an opportunity to enjoy the weather, explore somewhere new in the city, and above all, appreciate local art.

Make your Art Week schedule by checking out the full event listings here

URBAN
VISIONARIES  by  Alissa Sheldon   Those who attended the  Urban Visionaries  show last year remember the pleasant shock of
stumbling into  Viaduct Gallery  after a day at the  Des Moines Arts Festival  and
coming face-to-face with the works of  Keith Haring ,  Banksy , and  Shepard Fairey .  Just as noteworthy was the interaction with knowledgeable and approachable
 David Safris,  President of  Visionary Services , an IT consulting company, who is
the driving force behind the show. 
On June 24, Safris is bringing his collection, including work by  D*Face  and  FAILE , back to the  Des Moines Social Club  for  Art Week .  This year,
two female artists from the United States,  Caledonia Curry  (Swoon) and  Maya
Hayuk , will be exhibited with the collection.  Safris says, “Swoon puts her heart and soul
into every installation she works on and the artwork is transforming and
amazing for the communities she works with.  Maya Hayuk creates fantastic
multi colored geometric patterns and has done mural work in cities around the
world.”  To hear
more about the show from Safris, see the videos below.   Urban Visionaries Show    What is Urban Art?    Urban Art and “Selling Out”      Works by Keith Haring (top) and Shepard Fairey (bottom), Photo Credit:  David Safris

URBAN VISIONARIES

by Alissa Sheldon

Those who attended the Urban Visionaries show last year remember the pleasant shock of stumbling into Viaduct Gallery after a day at the Des Moines Arts Festival and coming face-to-face with the works of Keith Haring, Banksy, and Shepard Fairey.  Just as noteworthy was the interaction with knowledgeable and approachable David Safris, President of Visionary Services, an IT consulting company, who is the driving force behind the show. On June 24, Safris is bringing his collection, including work by D*Face and FAILE, back to the Des Moines Social Club for Art Week.

This year, two female artists from the United States, Caledonia Curry (Swoon) and Maya Hayuk, will be exhibited with the collection.  Safris says, “Swoon puts her heart and soul into every installation she works on and the artwork is transforming and amazing for the communities she works with.  Maya Hayuk creates fantastic multi colored geometric patterns and has done mural work in cities around the world.”

To hear more about the show from Safris, see the videos below.

Urban Visionaries Show

What is Urban Art?

Urban Art and “Selling Out”

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Works by Keith Haring (top) and Shepard Fairey (bottom), Photo Credit:  David Safris

Capturing the unusual Royal Shrovetide Football Match

Rules of the Game, Interrobang Film Festival

June 22-24, 2012

Rules of the Game - Official Trailer from Shift Key Films on Vimeo.

“There are very few rules in existence. The main ones are:

Committing murder or manslaughter is prohibited…”

~ Wikipedia, “Royal Shrovetide Football”


Interview by Alissa

June 29, 2012 

“The Rules of the Game”, a documentary produced, directed, and edited by British filmmaker Joanne Postlewaite, won Best of Show and Best Documentary Film at this year’s Interrobang Film Festival.  The film chronicles the highly unusual Royal Shrovetide Football Match, an intensely competitive game – part football, part rugby, part free-for-all - played annually in the town of Ashbourne in Derbyshire, England.  Lasting two days, Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday, the game has over 5,000 players attempting to score and protect goals that are three miles apart. 

Steeped in tradition and fiercely protected by the town, the event has been a relative mystery to the outside world until captured by Postlewaite and crew in 2011.  The filmmaker managed not only to gain entrée into this tightly knit enclave, but also was able to paint a compelling picture of the value of loyalty, tradition, and community pride.

Alissa Sheldon: How did you learn about the Royal Shrovetide Football game?  What sparked you to pursue the project?

Joanne Postlewaite: We wanted to start a series of documentaries about unusual events, and just kind of came across it. It was the craziest thing in the U.K. that we could find. Not many people outside of the town know about it.

AS: I notice one of the first rules of the game is that murder is prohibited.  Were you ever concerned for your safety during filming of the project?

JP: Well, people do get hurt, obviously.  It’s a rough and tough game.  But really none of us were really worried.  (laughs) Well, some of the crew were worried.  They were really quite pensive when they saw 5,000 people come running down the road.  But they were pretty careful of us and were kind and sort of helped us up if we got knocked down.

AS: What challenges did you face in the course of this project?

JP: At first the people in the town didn’t really want to talk about it.  They were very skeptical about doing the film.  They were a bit worried about health and safety - that if they got too many spectators it might get too dangerous.  They really wanted it to just be the players, no spectators. But we spent a lot of time chatting with the local men in the pubs, and they came to trust us, so we managed to find the story of the game and we did our best to tell it.

And other than the obvious physical challenges of the project, when it came time to edit, we had so much footage and so many files, sorting them out and putting the story together was a bit difficult.

AS: You were basically shooting live action that covered a span of three miles.  How did you arrange to have camera coverage of such a broad expanse of area?

JP: Well, we didn’t really have enough cameras to have people at both goals, so to get those shots, we had a “Goal Team” in a vehicle, but they still had to beat the runners.  Runners could get there in eight minutes, but we were trying to drive the country roads, and then there was one goal we couldn’t get right up to.

Things could change quickly, so we could spend hours near one goal, then it could change and eight minutes later we would have to be at the other goal, three miles away. We learned who the players were and we learned to follow them. 

There are no lights allowed in the game, only at the goal, and at night they would play in the pitch dark.  I once saw two players run off to the side away from the crowd, so I followed them with the camera.  It occurred to me after a few minutes, that I had to keep up with them or I would be stranded by myself in the middle of the countryside in the dark.  I never knew how fast I could run.

AS: Has the town seen the film?  What was their reaction?

JP: Yes, we had the premiere screening there, and they really loved it.  I was nervous, because they had been a bit wary about the film being made, because they were concerned about how we were going to portray this tradition of theirs.  They really just wanted to protect the game.

Of course, at the premiere screening, which we held in Ashbourne, the largest player in the town was sitting next to me, and I thought, “Oh, he’d better like it!”. I was actually very nervous about that, but he really enjoyed it. 

I think in the end they saw that we didn’t center on the negative, or try to make it look like some sort of mania, because that’s not really what we found as we filmed.  We found they had a great sense of humor and a long standing tradition.

AS: What are you working on next?

JP: I’d like to do a film about a very strange mining town in Australia.  We are working on getting funding together for that project.

AS: And how have you enjoyed your time in Des Moines?

JP: The people have been incredibly lovely – very friendly, and we’ve even been taken out to dinner by strangers.  We loved the East Village – especially the Locust Tap and Hill Vintage - and the Arts Festival was fantastic.  But mainly the people.  They’ve been really lovely… And we’re not just saying that.

Other winners at this year’s Interrobang Film Festival were:

Student Filmmaker Award ($200) Also, Best Short Film

Shu-Hsuan Lin

“Live Outside the Box”

Simon is a workaholic without any social contact. Gradually his world becomes smaller and smaller and at the very end, there is nothing left in his world but his work. This severe impact finally wakes him up and now Simon has to find the right way to bring his life back before everything is too late…

Best Iowa Filmmaker Award ($200)

Ted Rosean

“Man of Deeds”

Born into the chaos of the French Revolution, Mathias Loras would come to develop a vision for a state of spirituality in the New World that few dare dream.  Brought up in an elegant, bourgeois family, he would eventually become a missionary assigned to a remote outpost in the frontier territory of Iowa. There he would sow the seeds of the church to rough miners and farmers, while battling the unending hardships of life on edge of civilization.


Honorable Mention go to the following top of their categories:

Best Feature Film

Andrew Disney

“Searching for Sonny”

Best Mid Film

Terence Heuston

“Maddoggin'”

Best Free Form/Music Video

Mark Smith

“A House, A Home”

Best Animated Film

Dustin Grella

“Prayers for Peace”