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this week

weekly art forecasts from Central Iowa

Who’s exhibiting and opportunities for artists

Posts tagged architecture
Week of August 5
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P O R T R A I T  S T U D I O

Celebrate the last First Friday of summer at Eden.  Lounge on the couch and enjoy a cocktail while getting your portrait dawn by the artists of Portrait Studio.

E V E N T S :

FRI, AUG 7, 5 PM - First Friday Portrait Studio, Eden

FRI, AUG 7, 5 PM - Opening Reception, Expressive Strokes, Frame Works

FRI, AUG 7, 5 PM - Opening Reception, NEW WORK: Mike Baur | Jane Gilmor | Randy Richmond | Doug Shelton, Olson-Larsen Galleries

SUN, AUG 9, 1 PM - Art + Architecture Open House, American Enterprise Group

WED, AUG 12, 7 PM - Drink and Draw - Clothed Models, Capes Kafe

D E A D L I N E S :

Overalls All Over - Artist Applications Due August 7

NewBo Art Fest - Call for Artist DEADLINE August 15

Poste Print Festival - Call for Entries due September 1

ALL CALENDAR EVENTS

ARTIST OPPORTUNITIES

DOUBLE-LUSTRON DEATH

4111 Tonawanda, Des Moines IA

Demolished February 14, 2013 9:00 AM

A summary of photos and articles documenting recent abuse of a local historic landmark. -The Home Explorer

Video: Steve Wilke Shapiro

Hud Weeks’ former residence, the irreplaceable double-Lustron next to Salisbury House was demolished yesterday.  DeCarlo had commenced demolition by 9 am, much to the chagrin of Salisbury House staff when they sent out the “alarm”.  The demo permit was issued over the counter at about 11:30. 

For your online viewing pleasure - 

“Yesterday morning, I had a doctor’s appointment, so I arrived at Salisbury House around 9:40, two and half hours later than my normal early bird tendencies get me here. Literally, as I opened my car door, I heard a tremendous smashing sound, and looked west … just in time to see a huge backhoe drive straight into Hud’s house with its arm swinging. The garage had already been knocked down at this point, and the Lustron and atrium portions of the house were flattened in less than 30 minutes, the prefabricated materials easily scattered by the power of the backhoe’s arm. Only the pool house remained.” Read More.

What is a Lustron?

Who originally built and lived in the double-Lustron?

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Nellie and Hud Weeks, 1938. (Photo courtesy Cooper Weeks). Photo:Salisbury House

Hud was an avid outdoorsman, pilot and speedboat racer. He married Ellen “Nellie” Cooper — the daughter of legendary speedboater Jack “Pop” Cooper and a record setting racer in her own right — in 1938, and the young couple moved into the gardener’s cottage at Salisbury House (now our Visitors Center and Gift Shop) by 1940. Around 1950, Carl and Edith Weeks subdivided their original Salisbury House property to produce a 2.5 acre lot at the western end, separated from the main house by a deep ravine, for Hud and his family (now including son Cooper and daughter Barbara) to build their own home, a task to which Hud applied his usual exuberance and creative elan. 

The following photos were taken January 19, 2013. Death Date: February 14th, 2013.

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

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Photo: Rachel Buse

Plan to be at the Feb. 25 City Council meeting - 4:30 in City Hall - 
 
“In light of these recent developments, I have submitted a request to speak before the Des Moines City Council at its meeting Feb. 25, 2013 regarding issues surrounding historic preservation in Des Moines. If you are saddened or even outraged that this was allowed to happen, please plan to attend the Council meeting in support. Now more than ever we need to show solidarity and strength in numbers to bring awareness that Des Moines history is important…and worth saving.
Best Regards,
Sarah Oltrogge - President, Des Moines Historical Society”
New York Times Culture Critic and Foreign Correspondent in town Thursday

For the 2012 Fingerman Lecture, New York Times Culture Critic and Foreign Correspondent, Michael Kimmelman will be giving a FREE lecture at the Des Moines Art Center this Thursday, April 19th at 6:30 pm. 

Kimmelman has had an amazing writing career to date. Read this bit about his accomplishments, pulled from the Des Moines Art Center’s website:

Michael Kimmelman’s talk is an intimate and story-filled reflection on his path from The New York Times’s Chief Art Critic, trawling the world’s museums and galleries; to Foreign Correspondent (based in Berlin), reinventing cultural reporting from Marseille to Gaza to Berlin and Istanbul; all of which prepared the way for his current post as Architecture Critic, writing about issues of urban policy and how we live. In the process, Mr. Kimmelman will also talk about the role of criticism today and the issues facing cities at a time when society and the global economy are rapidly changing.

Since he returned to New York from Europe in autumn 2011, Michael Kimmelman has been reshaping the public debate about urbanism, architecture, and architectural criticism. In the few  brief months he has occupied the position of chief architecture critic for The New York Times, he has started a kind of revolution, focusing on issues of public space, housing for the poor, slums redevelopment, parks, and infrastructure. It has been the latest surprise in a career of dizzying changes and accomplishments. Read more.

Never miss a free lecture at the Des Moines Art Center. NEVER. Let the Art Center know you’re coming. Email them how many seats you’ll need: lectures@desmoinesartcenter.org